AAUSC

American Association of University Supervisors, Coordinators, and Directors of Language Programs

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Events

AAUSC at ACTFL

AAUSC holds its annual meeting at the annual conference of ACTFL, the weekend before Thanksgiving. Each year we host our business meeting/panel discussion/wine reception, and a number of AAUSC members present sessions of interest to LPDs (see AAUSC SPOTLIGHT sessions in the Events calendar below).

The ACTFL conference is the best opportunity to meet fellow AAUSC members and discuss the most timely issues in language teaching, language program direction, and graduate student training/professionalization.

This year's ACTFL will take place in Nashville TN, November 17-19, 2017. Check back here for more information as the date approaches.

AAUSC at MLA

Having gained affiliated status with the MLA, the AAUSC also holds one session each year at the MLA convention, which takes place every year in January, immediately following New Year's day.

Upcoming events

    • 22 Nov 2019
    • 11:00 AM - 11:45 AM (EST)
    • 209B

    This session deals with the AP Chinese course and the results of the exams, and the design and implementation of effective teaching methods to help students of AP Chinese or similar proficiency levels develop their communicative competence. Specific examples will be used to show how theme-based and task-oriented activities are used for achieving excellence in AP Chinese.


    Jianhua Bai

    • 22 Nov 2019
    • 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM (EST)
    • Marriott Marquis, Cherry Blossom Room

    Annual meeting of the AAUSC Board of Directors (Executive Committee, all language section conveners, AAUSC publications editors)

    • 22 Nov 2019
    • 12:00 PM - 12:15 PM (EST)
    • 158B

    In a time when L2 instructor-student contact hours/minutes seem to steadily decrease at institutions across the country, it is essential to maximize the time students have for face-to-face interaction to ensure that they are given the opportunity to actively engage with one another at higher levels of cognition. 

    Following a curricular redesign, qualitative data was gathered, as evidence of learning, over the course of 1 1/2 years to assess transcultural proficiency. At the same, an independent online testing company that uses ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines in their assessment was hired to measure the test takers' language ability. Students in their first-year of language study showed higher levels of linguistic and transcultural proficiency than their second-year counterparts. A control group of students that went through the entire first-year sequence in the new curriculum and started their first course in the second-year of language study also placed higher than their third-year counterparts.

    Will K. Reyes-Cubides, MIT

    • 22 Nov 2019
    • 12:00 PM - 12:20 PM (EST)
    • 149A

    This presentation will discuss the experience of working with undergraduate teaching assistants in beginning foreign language classes in a liberal arts college and will highlight advantages and challenges from a two-fold perspective: that of the faculty supervisor and that of the undergraduate teaching assistants. Presenters will examine roles and responsibilities of undergraduate teaching assistants and supervisors, will discuss training and mentoring of the apprentice teachers, will present examples of best practices in and outside of class and students' feedback. The faculty supervisor and undergraduate teaching assistants will share their viewpoint and assessment on the teaching experience and will provide practical examples for successful peer-teaching instruction. 

    Sara Mattavelli, William & Mary

    Antonella Nicholas, William & Mary

    • 22 Nov 2019
    • 12:00 PM - 12:45 PM (EST)
    • West Overlook

    Research in the area of speaking proficiency has shown that there is a lack of attention to systematic language proficiency development in upper-level courses (e.g., Darhower, 2014). Factors affecting this deficiency include differences in approaches and treatment of language development between lower- and upper-level courses, commonly referred as language-content divide (Paesani & Allen, 2012). This session reports on an initiative that integrated systematic and explicit attention to speaking development in third-year Arabic, German, and Spanish courses. We first discuss proficiency results that prompted the initiative. Next, we outline the collaborative processes between administrators, faculty, and TAs for developing instructional activities that merge language and literary-cultural learning and promote advanced-level speaking practice. Finally, we offer suggestions for integrating curricula that promote advanced-level speaking and for collaborations across multiple groups.


    Alex Korte

    Emily Groepper

    Adolfo Carrillo Cabello

    • 22 Nov 2019
    • 1:30 PM - 1:50 PM (EST)
    • 158A

    The NCSSFL-ACTFL Can-Do Statements for Intercultural Communication (IC) support language learners' development of intercultural communicative competence during and outside of class. Technology allows language educators to design assignments that provide learners with opportunities to investigate and reflect upon the relationships between products and practices in their own and other cultures in order to understand perspectives. This presentation provides examples of four assignments using authentic resources in Spanish about two different themes (food and shopping) that are aligned with the Investigate benchmark and performance indicators for novice- and intermediate-levels of proficiency (to identify and compare products and practices) in the Can-Do Statements for IC using two freely-available tools: Padlet and ThingLink. These sample assignments could be adapted to other languages, to different levels of proficiency, and also could be created with other commonly-used technologies.


    Lee B. Abraham, Columbia University

    • 22 Nov 2019
    • 1:30 PM - 2:15 PM (EST)
    • 103A

    Discover an innovative design for an advanced French course organized around the contemporary themes of sustainability, the sharing economy, and social entrepreneurship. Using authentic materials from the francophone professional world, students explore global trends while developing cultural and communicative competence. 

    Mary Beth Raycraft

    Nathalie Dieu-Porter

    Deb Reisinger

    https://ww5.aievolution.com/tfl1901/index.cfmdo=abs.viewAbs&abs=1293

    • 22 Nov 2019
    • 1:30 PM - 2:15 PM (EST)
    • 143B

    How can embodied learning connect foreign language proficiency to self-reflexive thinking about intercultural identity and migration? Focusing primarily on Elfriede Jelinek's "Die Schutzbefohlenen" (2013), this session explores collaborative creative writing and performance as a means to promote transcultural competence and tolerance.


    Lisa Parkes (Harvard)

    Simone Seym (Arizona U)

    Margarete Lamb-Faffelberger (Lafayette C)

    • 22 Nov 2019
    • 1:30 PM - 2:15 PM (EST)
    • 143A

    Teaching approaches and methods, textbooks, access to authentic materials, curricula, assessment, standards, classrooms and virtual learning spaces, technologies, and learners--all have changed in profound ways over the years. This session explores how training is keeping up with the demands and responsibilities of teaching German in the 21st century.

    Jeanne Schueller, University of Wisconsin-Madison

    Devon Donohue-Bergeler, University of Texas at San Antonio

    Jane Sokolosky, Brown University  

    • 22 Nov 2019
    • 1:45 PM - 2:45 PM (EST)
    • Marriott Marquis, Gallaudent University Room
    Program and Departmental Resiliency/Relevance. Resiliency is a term often used in connection with climate change, but it is well suited to foreign language education too: how are we adapting to the changing landscape of L2 education? What can we do to promote French as a relevant field of study, starting within our home institutions? Resiliency and relevance connect to several areas, including innovation via pedagogical practices and technology, questions of equity, open education – come and expand the discussion!
    • 22 Nov 2019
    • 2:30 PM - 3:15 PM (EST)
    • 149B

    This presentation illustrates pedagogical applications of virtual reality in the foreign language classroom. Presenters will share insights and examples of the use of virtual reality for language learning, a tool that allows for authentic, engaging, and interactive experiences. Headsets will be available to experience virtual environments.


    Margherita Berti, University of Arizona

    Stefano Maranzana, Southern Methodist University

    Jacob Monzingo, University of Arizona

    • 22 Nov 2019
    • 2:30 PM - 3:15 PM (EST)
    • 145A

    How do students learn in a flipped classroom? How can we leverage can-do statements to achieve student success? This session explores student experiences and outcomes using digital materials designed to foster translingual and transcultural competence and integrating self-assessment and reflection. Come see what a 21st century classroom looks like!


    Gillian Lord, U Florida

    Amy Rossomondo, U Kansas

    • 22 Nov 2019
    • 2:45 PM - 3:45 PM (EST)
    • Marriott Marquis, Gallaudet University Room
    Discussion of possibilities for collaboration and professional learning networks for German LPDs and Graduate Students. Members are invited to bring topic for discussion to the meeting.
    • 22 Nov 2019
    • 3:00 PM - 3:15 PM (EST)
    • 159A

    This paper explores a linguistic feature of academic texts, syntactic complexity, in the writing of middle school Spanish immersion students. It reports on changes over time and explores implications for classroom practice.

    Mandy Menke, University of Minnesota

    • 22 Nov 2019
    • 3:30 PM - 3:45 PM (EST)
    • 204A

    This study identifies what topics may emerge in authentic discourse between American college students and their Chinese peers, and how topics may change in such discourse over time. Nine American students from two programs in China and their nine Chinese roommates participated in this study. They submitted 1070 minutes of audio recorded conversations. Semi-structured interviews were also conducted with each participant.

    Using a grounded theory approach (Creswell, 2013), this study identifies 17 recurring topic categories. There was a "here and now" tendency (Kinginger, 2008); for example, while "everyday life" occurred in every student's recording, "family" was not a frequent topic. Next, by focusing on two students, the findings show that the organization of the topics are jointly constructed between the interlocutors. This comparison highlights factors to consider when matching students with their Chinese hosts, such as their academic background and how they interpret gender.

    Program Guide Description:

    Based on audio-recorded conversational data (total=1,070 minutes) collected from 9 American students and their Chinese roommates over the course of one semester, this study identifies 17 frequently discussed topics in the peer conversations. It further focuses on two students to demonstrate two distinctive types of topic developmental trajectories.

    Yi Wang, University of Arizona

    Wenhao Diao, University of Arizona

    • 22 Nov 2019
    • 3:45 PM - 4:45 PM (EST)
    • Marriott Marquis, Gallaudet University Room

    Presentation of a brand new online portal for teaching hybrid and online Slavic language courses-  LLC Commons. The portal contains several hundreds of  interactive video lessons for hybrid and online courses designed to accompany most Russian textbooks, instructions on how to embed lesson in LMS, a digital map of Slavic Departments in the US, resources on hybrid and online teaching, etc.

    • 22 Nov 2019
    • 4:30 PM - 5:15 PM (EST)
    • 145A
    State World Language Programs are facing extinction due to a lack of graduates from WLE programs. This session will provide attendees a detailed program and sample timeline for implementing ACTFL's Educators Rising Program at the school, district, or state level. Logistics, results, and participant reflections will also be discussed.
    • 22 Nov 2019
    • 4:45 PM - 5:45 PM (EST)
    • Marriott Marquis, Gallaudet University Room

    Discussion on ideas and best practices on how to successfully attract and/or retain a diverse student population and encourage them to take more than the minimum language requirement courses.

    • 22 Nov 2019
    • 5:30 PM - 6:15 PM (EST)
    • WEWCC Room 145B

    This study examines how structured reflections in French and German sociolinguistics courses facilitate students’ understanding of linguistic variation, a key course concept. Using transformative learning, the analysis tracks learners’ perspective-shifting moments and considers the contributions of linguistics in FL curricula and the humanities.

    Cori Crane, Duke University

    Brian Barnett, University of Minnesota

    • 22 Nov 2019
    • 5:45 PM - 6:45 PM (EST)
    • Marriott Marquis, Gallaudet University Room

    Asian: Information session about Asian languages in AAUSC.

    Arabic: Group discussion on the integration of the ACTFL Standards in Arabic

    • 23 Nov 2019
    • 8:00 AM - 8:45 AM (EST)
    • 147B

    This session shares a set of social justice-focused videos and activities certain to captivate today's lower-level learner. Using a thought-provoking and challenging video, Latinoamérica, the presenter will offer step-by-step literacy-based strategies on how to select and scaffold provocative and authentic videos to promote listening proficiency.

    Sara Finney, University of Minnesota


    • 23 Nov 2019
    • 9:00 AM - 9:45 AM (EST)
    • 144B

    This session reports on a project that addressed the plateau students demonstrate in speaking development during the third year of language study, as confirmed by four years of large-scale proficiency testing. By incorporating activities that elicit extended discourse in upper-level Arabic, German, and Spanish courses, our project addressed the question: How can students continue to improve their FL speaking proficiency after reaching the intermediate level? We first provide an overview of the design and implementation of techniques (e.g., collaborative dialogues, presentational exercises, jigsaw activities, and role plays) designed for upper-level content courses. We then describe the activities and explain how they fit within the course and program curriculum and discuss outcomes as the instructors and students perceived them. We conclude by addressing the benefits and challenges of providing student feedback, considering both a focus on form and on meaning.

    Emily Groepper, Adolfo Carrillo Cabello, Alex Korte, Emily Sumner (University of Minnesota)

    • 23 Nov 2019
    • 10:00 AM - 10:45 AM (EST)
    • 152A

    Learn how authentic resources can be used in proficiency-based classrooms to promote language acquisition, cultural awareness, and social justice. This session provides concrete examples of how authentic resources and accompanying activities can promote the critical study of culture in Novice and Intermediate K-12 and post-secondary classrooms.

    Dori Perugini, Glastonbury Public Schools

    Stacey Johnson, Vanderbilt U

    LJ Randolph, U of NC Wilmington

    • 23 Nov 2019
    • 10:00 AM - 10:50 AM (EST)
    • 152A

    Learn how authentic resources can be used in proficiency-based classrooms to promote language acquisition, cultural awareness, and social justice. This session provides concrete examples of how authentic resources and accompanying activities can promote the critical study of culture in novice and intermediate K-12 and post-secondary classrooms.

    Stacey M Johnson, Vanderbilt

    LJ Randolph, UNC Wilmington

    Dorie Conlon Perugini, Glastonbury Schools

    • 23 Nov 2019
    • 10:00 AM - 11:15 AM (EST)
    • 159A

    Genre-based approaches develop students' abilities to connect linguistic elements with social functions. This paper analyzes interview, assessment, and classwork data from an Arabic class that followed this approach. The results show benefits for the development of sociolinguistic and pragmatic competence and student engagement.

    Emma Trentman, University of New Mexico

    • 23 Nov 2019
    • 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM (EST)
    • Marriott Marquis, Cherry Blossom Room

    AAUSC Editorial Board meeting

    • 23 Nov 2019
    • 12:15 PM - 1:30 PM (EST)
    • Marriott Marquis, Gallaudet University Room

    Hot topics in language programs: an interactive discussion around your burning questions

    • 23 Nov 2019
    • 1:30 PM - 2:15 PM (EST)
    • 155

    Research on language teaching and learning is critical to sustaining and improving our field. To further such research, ACTFL and Middlebury Language Schools developed the ACTFL/Middlebury Summer Research Forum, a retreat for language researchers. This session discusses the Forum and how this innovative approach supports such research.

    Per Urlaub, Middlebury College

    Margaret Malone, Georgetown University & ACTFL

    • 23 Nov 2019
    • 4:30 PM - 5:15 PM (EST)
    • 143B

    The theoretical and practical research on L2 grammar is vast and covers multiple research fields. The challenge for classroom teaching is how to select, synthesize, apply, and transform this research into concrete pedagogical practices, particularly ones that promote literacy. The difficulty is compounded by the persistence of flawed assumptions, e.g. that grammar study automatically results in communicative ability or that grammatical ability automatically follows successful speech acts. Drawing on Systemic Functional Linguistics (SFL), Second Language Acquisition (SLA), and the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SOTL), this presentation will focus on research-driven strategies to teach grammar in L2, specifically as a means of promoting literacy. We will embrace the functional perspective of grammar as a rich resource for making contextualized meanings, while also examining ways to integrate insights from SLA. Staging, spiraling, and recycling of grammar will also be addressed.


    Scott Windham, Elon University

    Marianna Ryshina-Pankova, Georgetown University

    Eckhard Kuhn-Osius, Hunter College, CUNY 

    • 23 Nov 2019
    • 4:30 PM - 5:15 PM (EST)
    • 149A


    Veronica Vegna, The University of Chicago

    Chiara Fabbian, University of Illinois at Chicago

    Elizabeth Porretto, The University of Chicago

    • 23 Nov 2019
    • 4:30 PM - 5:15 PM (EST)
    • 149A

    What does it mean to prepare students for the 21st century? With this question as a starting point, the panel discusses materials that exemplify a holistic and interdisciplinary approach to the teaching of Italian, and examines content-based instruction methodologies and best practices that foster intercultural reflection and critical thinking.

    Chiara Fabbian, University of Illinois at Chicago

    Veronica Vegna, Elizabeth Porretto

    • 23 Nov 2019
    • 4:30 PM - 5:15 PM (EST)
    • 206

    The presenters will discuss the team approach, process, and best practices for creating an online book that makes use of authentic materials that are freely available. The tools for creating such a book are free and easy to use. They will share how this has impacted students' learning experiences and progress over four semesters of use.

    Clara Roman-Odio, Kenyon College

    Ana Ramirez, St. Andrew's School

    • 23 Nov 2019
    • 4:30 PM - 6:30 PM (EST)
    • Marriott Marquis, Magnolia Room

    In their article, “Ten Years after the MLA Report: What Has Changed in Foreign Language Departments?”(ADFL Bulletin 4, 2018: pp. 116-20), Lomicka and Lord conclude that many of the 2007 MLA Report’s recommendations remain unmet. One unrealized suggestion -- that of creating collaborations among colleagues to invigorate curricula and attract students -- is particularly compelling: 

    “The work of revamping and unifying the language department curriculum can only be carried out through a sustained collaboration among all members of the teaching corps, including tenure-line faculty members and those with contingent and long-term appointments in all related fields, such as linguistics, literature, and language pedagogy.” (2007 MLA Report, p. 240).

    To begin the session, Stacey Katz Bourns (a linguist), Cheryl Krueger (a literary scholar), and Nicole Mills (a language pedagogy specialist) share their insights regarding the benefits and challenges of working with colleagues from different academic backgrounds to achieve strong collaborations and develop robust programs. Their observations are based on research that they conducted for their recent book, Perspectives on Teaching Language and Content (Yale University Press, to appear in spring 2020).

    Most of the session will consist of breakout groups, led by AAUSC colleagues (see below). The groups will explore various types of collaborations, both within and beyond language departments, focusing on best practices and potential initiatives. At the end of the session, the groups will share their ideas and recommendations with all attendees.

    Break-out groups:

    1. Collaborations with colleagues from different languages and pedagogical traditions (Stacey Katz Bourns, Northeastern U)

    2. Collaborations among language and literature colleagues about curriculum development and/or pedagogy (Cheryl Krueger, U Virginia)

    3. Collaborations with graduate students on curriculum development (Nicole Mills, Harvard U)

    4. Collaborations with K-12 programs  (Per Urlaub, Middlebury College)

    5. Collaborations between language centers and departments (Nelleke Van Deusen-Scholl, Yale U)

    6. Collaborations across the curriculum (Deb Reisinger, Duke U)

    • 23 Nov 2019
    • 5:30 PM - 5:45 PM (EST)
    • 156

    Measuring Dual Immersion Students' Proficiency: Findings and Challenges

    Johanna Watzinger-Tharp (U Utah)

    Fernando Rubio (U Utah)

    • 24 Nov 2019
    • 8:00 AM - 8:45 AM (EST)
    • 103B

    This presentation will explore reflective activities and assessments that align with student learning outcomes in community-based language courses. Participants will discover how individual and group activities, spoken and written reflections, and project-based learning can foster and assess learning outcomes that support transformative learning.  

    Deborah Reisinger

    Joan Clifford

    https://ww5.aievolution.com/tfl1901/index.cfmdo=abs.viewAbs&abs=1286

    • 24 Nov 2019
    • 8:00 AM - 8:45 AM (EST)
    • 143C

    German Grammar Videos and the Flipped Classroom

    Learn about the applicability of the flipped classroom to German grammar instruction. The presenters will discuss their experiences creating a grammar video series for beginning German (second semester). This discussion will cover the theory, creation, and evaluation of the videos.


    Christina Weiler, UNC at Chapel Hill

    Claire Scott, Grinnell College

    Kyung Lee Gagum, Midwestern State University

    • 24 Nov 2019
    • 8:00 AM - 8:45 AM (EST)
    • 102B

    The session will present the final results of a major IES-funded study of the relationship between enrollment in dual language immersion and academic outcomes. Following the major study of Portland Public Schools, senior researchers from American Councils Research Center and the University of Utah will present IES Study Final results.

    Robert Slater, American Councils Research Center

    Johanna Watzinger-Tharp, U Utah

    • 10 Jan 2020
    • 8:30 AM - 9:45 AM
    • Chelan 5 (WSCC)

    AAUSC will hold sessions at the 2020 MLA Conference:

    1. Past, Present, and Future Challenges in Educating the Future Foreign Language Professoriat, Heather Willis Allen (U of Wisconsin, Madison) [#11432]

    2. Redefining Speakership: The Impact of Postmodern Sociolinguistics on Second-Language Teaching and Learning, Carl Blyth (U of Texas, Austin) [#11434]

    3. Examining L2 Learning and Teaching Issues in Hybrid, Online, and Open Environments, Joshua Thoms (Utah State U) [#11435]


    Presiding:

    Kate Paesani (U of Minnesota, Twin Cities)
    Johanna Watzinger-Tharp (U of Utah)

Past events

18 Nov 2018 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Internationalization and iinterdisciplinary collaboration on campus
17 Nov 2018 AAUSC Spotlight: Redefining Oral Assessment: Incorporating OPI Testing Skills in the Curriculum
17 Nov 2018 AAUSC Spotlight: Creating Inclusivity in the Diverse Language Classroom
17 Nov 2018 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Letting go of the textbook in intermediate college German courses
17 Nov 2018 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: A socially networked E-portfolio for the classroom of the future
17 Nov 2018 AAUSC Spotlight: Understanding Classroom Life through Exploratory Practice
17 Nov 2018 AAUSC Spotlight: Moving students from primary to secondary discourse: A literacy approach
17 Nov 2018 AAUSC Spotlight: Exploring learners' reactions and attitudes towards interpersonal tasks
16 Nov 2018 AAUSC Spotlight: Shifting expectations and attitudes: Juxtaposing IPAs with traditional tests
16 Nov 2018 AAUSC Spotligt: Exploring the new AATI Italian National Exam (NIE): A Path Toward Proficiencyath Toward Proficiency
16 Nov 2018 AAUSC Spotlight: ACCESO: Integrate an open educational resource into your Spanish classroom
16 Nov 2018 AAUSC Spotlight: Connecting Theory and Practice in a Pre-service Teacher Methods Class
16 Nov 2018 AAUSC Spotlight: Issues in program-wide assessment: Teachers and students tell all
16 Nov 2018 AAUSC Spotlight: Better Together: K-16 Collaboration on Using Authentic German Resources
16 Nov 2018 AAUSC Spotlight: Enacting Social Justice in Teacher Education
16 Nov 2018 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Where language education meets the humanities: Best practices and models
16 Nov 2018 AAUSC Spotlight: Meeting Expectations: Proficiency Assessment and Curricular Response
16 Nov 2018 AAUSC Spotlight: 7 billion others and me: Introspection for global tolerance
19 Nov 2017 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Teaching French for Change: Social Entrepreneurship in the FSP Classroom
19 Nov 2017 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Leadership tips for bilingual workplaces: Lessons from Latino/a leaders
19 Nov 2017 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Making Multiliteracies Real: A Tool for Analyzing Instructional Materials
19 Nov 2017 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Experiencing Best Practices in the Technology-infused German Classroom
19 Nov 2017 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Teaching Varieties: Authentic Language in the German Classroom
19 Nov 2017 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Connections: Case Studies on Linking Literature and Language Teaching
19 Nov 2017 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: How Foreign are the AP exams? The Case of Heritage Learners
19 Nov 2017 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Revisiting the MLA Report: A Survey on Language Study in Higher Education
18 Nov 2017 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Service learning research: Achievements, opportunities and challenges
18 Nov 2017 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Breaking New Ground in Community Engaged Language Learning
18 Nov 2017 AAUSC Annual Business Meeting and Reception
18 Nov 2017 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Peace and conflict in the German classroom: An intercultural imperative
18 Nov 2017 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Socio-Literacy and Engagement in the Italian Classroom
18 Nov 2017 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Rethinking Writing Instruction in the Lower-Level French Classroom
18 Nov 2017 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Promoting Oral Proficiency through Social Justice themes in Grades 6-16
18 Nov 2017 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Learn Chinese in China: Perceptions, Conflicts, and Experience
18 Nov 2017 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Teaching Multimodal Narratives for Foreign Language Learning
18 Nov 2017 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Teaching Perspectives: Intercultural Development at all Levels
18 Nov 2017 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Genre-based Writing in the Communicative Curriculum
18 Nov 2017 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Inventions, Innovations, Connections: STEM and German Literature
18 Nov 2017 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Recruitment in Language Programs: Bolstering Enrollment
18 Nov 2017 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: No Longer on the Sidelines: Planning for Integrated Listening Instruction
18 Nov 2017 AAUSC Editorial Board meeting
18 Nov 2017 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Increasing Language Proficiency Through Project-based Language Learning
18 Nov 2017 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Improving University Students’ Experience Through Program-wide Assessment
17 Nov 2017 AAUSC French sector
17 Nov 2017 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Global Issues, Debates and Learning Community
17 Nov 2017 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Grammar as Vocabulary: Language Gains through Input-Based Acquisition
17 Nov 2017 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Authentic Film With Beginning Learners: Theory Meets Practice
17 Nov 2017 AAUSC Spanish and Portuguese sectors
17 Nov 2017 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: From Anxiety-Producing to Confidence-Building: Re-experiencing Assessment
17 Nov 2017 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Methods Online: Purpose, Audience, Content, Performance
17 Nov 2017 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Integrating Social Justice and Teaching Syria
17 Nov 2017 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT:Starting College, Quitting Chinese: Language Learning in the Freshman Year
17 Nov 2017 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Promoting Translingual/Transcultural Competence Through Interdisciplinarity
17 Nov 2017 AAUSC Italian sector meeting
17 Nov 2017 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: An Innovative Way to Practice the Three Modes of Communication: Voicethread
17 Nov 2017 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Building Cultural Competency in Short Term Study Abroad Programs
17 Nov 2017 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Teaching the Syrian Solidarity Crisis
17 Nov 2017 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: International Students' L3 Development in the L2 Classroom
17 Nov 2017 AAUSC German sector meeting
17 Nov 2017 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: ACTFL/CAEP Program Review and Update
17 Nov 2017 AAUSC Executive Committee meeting
17 Nov 2017 AAUSC Arabic and Asian sectors
17 Nov 2017 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Social Justice in the Language Classroom: A Call to Action
17 Nov 2017 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Literacy-oriented Instruction in the Foreign Language Curriculum
17 Nov 2017 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Social Justice in the Language Classroom: A Call to Action
17 Nov 2017 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Integrating Heritage Speakers in Recent Immigration Areas: Where to Start?
06 Jan 2017 AAUSC @ MLA 2017
09 Jan 2016 100 years of the Modern Language Journal
08 Jan 2016 AAUSC @ MLA 2016: Quo vadimus? Identity and Creativity as Keys to Enhancing Language Study in the Undergraduate Curriculum
22 Nov 2015 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Institutional assessment of second language learning outcomes
22 Nov 2015 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: The Literary in the Everyday: Teaching Language as Meaning
22 Nov 2015 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: The World Is Not Flat, So Why Are Our Textbooks
22 Nov 2015 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Ride-sharing and wwoofing: Task-based instruction in the digital age
21 Nov 2015 AAUSC Business meeting
21 Nov 2015 Celebrating 100 years of the Modern Language Journal
21 Nov 2015 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Meaningful Engagement: Pick Your Own Adventure
21 Nov 2015 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Reading and listening proficiency levels of college undergraduates
21 Nov 2015 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Preparing your AP students for Advanced-level writing
21 Nov 2015 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Community and collaboration: The city, our classroom
21 Nov 2015 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Perspective-Shifting and Transformative Learning: Learning in and through Structured Reflection
21 Nov 2015 AAUSC Executive Committee
21 Nov 2015 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Mapping the Text: Strategies to Move from Comprehension to Interpretation
21 Nov 2015 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Course design and asynchronous Learning in the Italian Classroom
21 Nov 2015 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Using Open Educational Resources in K-12 and Post-Secondary Contexts
21 Nov 2015 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Inspire New German Teachers: Recruit and Maintain Quality Educators
21 Nov 2015 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Best Practices for Incorporating Google Apps into Language Classes
21 Nov 2015 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: The link between interaction and proficiency in dual language immersion
21 Nov 2015 AAUSC Editorial Board
21 Nov 2015 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Authentic Texts and Oral Language Developoment Across Instructional Levels
20 Nov 2015 AAUSC Spanish Sector Roundtable
20 Nov 2015 AAUSC German Sector Roundtable
20 Nov 2015 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: "My Generation": Youth Culture in the Advanced German Curriculum
20 Nov 2015 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: From Classroom to Community: Developing a Fully Online Content-Based Course
20 Nov 2015 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Digital Humanities and German Studies: Part 2
20 Nov 2015 AAUSC French Sector Roundtable
20 Nov 2015 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Free Standards-Based Language Teaching Resources from the LRCs
20 Nov 2015 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Intepreting digital texts: Critical media literacy in the WL classroom
20 Nov 2015 AAUSC Italian Sector Roundtable
20 Nov 2015 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT:Transformative language learning: From theory to practice
20 Nov 2015 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: Digital games in the German classroom
20 Nov 2015 AAUSC SPOTLIGHT: 25 TECHNOLOGY TOOLS TO INSPIRE, ENGAGE, AND TRANSFORM LANGUAGE LEARNING
20 Nov 2015 AAUSC @ ACTFL
10 Jan 2015 AAUSC @ MLA
23 Nov 2014 AAUSC spotlight: The anatomy of an online course: How to create a successful course using QM
23 Nov 2014 AAUSC spotlight: Integrating language and content at the advanced level
23 Nov 2014 AAUSC spotlight: From frameworks to oversight: Improving foreign language program efficiency
23 Nov 2014 AAUSC spotlight: Aligning goals, objectives, and assessments: A multiliteracies perspective
22 Nov 2014 AAUSC spotlight: Integrating theater performance workshops in beginning language courses
22 Nov 2014 AAUSC spotlight: Russian language readiness for TAs in graduate programs
22 Nov 2014 AAUSC Business Meeting and Reception
22 Nov 2014 AAUSC spotlight: The promise of social reading for foreign language learning
22 Nov 2014 AAUSC German sector meeting
22 Nov 2014 AAUSC spotlight: It's all relative: Pronouns and generative grammar in hybrid classes
22 Nov 2014 AAUSC spotlight: Blending seamlessly: Connecting students online and in class
22 Nov 2014 AAUSC spotlight: A capacity framework for outcomes assessment in college language programs
22 Nov 2014 AAUSC spotlight: Blended learning: Not just for the classroom
22 Nov 2014 AAUSC spotlight: Transformational and transcultural learning through structured reflection
22 Nov 2014 AAUSC spotlight: Guidelines for evaluating and strengthening foreign language programs
22 Nov 2014 AAUSC spotlight: Learning syntax, morphology and basic grammar through authentic literary texts
22 Nov 2014 AAUSC Editorial Board Meeting
21 Nov 2014 AAUSC spotlight: Beyond the standard variety: Analysis and (re)production of dialects and registers
21 Nov 2014 AAUSC spotlight: Teaching French, Italian, or Portuguese to heritage Spanish speakers
21 Nov 2014 AAUSC Italian Sector meeting
21 Nov 2014 AAUSC spotlight: Measuring learning outcomes in collegiate German programs
21 Nov 2014 AAUSC spotlight: Rosetta Stone for language teaching and learning: Yay or nay?
21 Nov 2014 AAUSC Executive Committee Meeting
21 Nov 2014 AAUSC spotlight: The use of Spanish course grade prerequisites at R1 universities
21 Nov 2014 AAUSC spotlight: Cultural studies in the language classroom: A focus on urban landscapes
10 Jan 2014 AAUSC @ MLA
23 Nov 2013 AAUSC Annual Business Meeting, Panel Discussion, and Reception
23 Nov 2013 Meeting of the German section of AAUSC
23 Nov 2013 AATG/AAUSC paper session @ ACTFL 2013
23 Nov 2013 AATI/AAUSC paper session @ ACTFL
23 Nov 2013 AAUSC Editorial Board Meeting
22 Nov 2013 AAUSC Executive Committee Meeting
05 Jan 2013 AAUSC @ MLA
17 Nov 2012 AAUSC Annual Business Meeting, Poster Session, and Reception
17 Nov 2012 AAUSC paper session @ ACTFL
20 Nov 2011 AAUSC paper session @ ACTFL
20 Nov 2011 AATG/AAUSC Paper Session @ ACTFL
19 Nov 2011 AAUSC Annual Business Meeting, Panel Session, and Reception
19 Nov 2011 AAUSC Editorial Board Meeting
18 Nov 2011 AAUSC Executive Committee Meeting
26 Mar 2011 AAUSC Meeting at AAAL in Chicago
07 Jan 2011 AAUSC @ MLA
20 Nov 2010 AAUSC Annual Business Meeting, Panel Discussion, and Reception
20 Nov 2010 AAUSC @ ACTFL
29 Dec 2009 AAUSC @ MLA !!!
21 Nov 2009 AAUSC Annual Business Meeting and Panel Session
21 Nov 2009 Re-envisioning graduate student teacher education in the 21st century
21 Nov 2009 AAUSC Editorial Board meeting
20 Nov 2009 AAUSC Executive Board meeting
02 Jun 2009 CERCLL: Center for Educational Resources in Culture, Language and Literacy
21 Mar 2009 American Association for Applied Linguistics (AAAL)
10 Mar 2009 CALICO 2009

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